If you want a golden rule that will fit everything, this is it: Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.William Morris.

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Yarn Along

I can't believe I actually finish something. Here lately all I've been able to do is garden work and canning.





I know it isn't much but I'll take it.
As you can see it is just a garter stitch the width of the bag I made. This bag is a sample bag for what I want to make. I have some vintage linen that I want to use as the outer bag. 
I like my sample bag though.



The book is a new one I found on Amazon when trying to find something else. I haven't started it yet but hope to this week. I did finished "The Kitchen House". Really enjoyed the book, would've wanted to hear more.



Here is what the book is about

Tears of frustration and loneliness more than once filled the eyes of Marjorie Myers Douglas as she valiantly coped with her new status as a farmwife. Life on a western Minnesota stock ranch in the years during and after World War II was, after all, a far cry from growing up in her parents' Minneapolis home community of academics and her years as a medical social worker in New York City and St. Paul. It all began in 1943 as a two-year plan to help Don's ill father avoid losing the 1,200-acre farm. With World War II pulling able-bodied men into the military, it was nearly impossible to find good farmhands, and Don felt an obligation to contribute to his father's physical and economic recovery from a severe heart attack. Leaving their modern suburban house behind, Marjorie, Don, and baby Anne moved their worldly goods to the simple farmhouse some three miles from the little town of Appleton. For Marjorie it was more a challenge than just a change - a challenge that stretched far beyond the two years into seventeen! In Eggs in the Coffee, Sheep in the Corn Marjorie Douglas tells how she faced the challenge and came out on top: raising three babies in a house with no running water; learning to understand and live with a demanding father-in-law; providing an ever-ready supply of coffee to go with endless lunches, dinners, and suppers; nurturing peonies for the touch of beauty she needed; making new friends and playing whist; establishing working relationships with the farm animals; finding some satisfaction in her own PTA and church work; keeping the sheep out of the raspberries; canning fifty quarts of rhubarb sauce; getting acquainted with German prisoners of war; butchering eighty-fivechickens. With sharp wit and quiet wisdom, Douglas offers a candid view of life in rural Minnesota from 1943 to 1960. Her stories will ring true to anyone who has ever experienced farm life and will pleasantly bring understanding to anyone who hasn't.









2 comments:

  1. That book sounds lovely! Thank you for the link!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love the bag. The book looks interpreting too.

    ReplyDelete

Welcome friends to share a thought, I enjoy reading them and will try my best to reply back by email most of the time. But if you do not hear back it's because you are a no-reply blogger.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...